In Class Annotation/ Critique

An article written by Max Roser, “Vaccinations”, argues the reduction and prevention of disease is controlled by vaccinations. With the use of graphs and charts, ” we see how we are benefitting from vaccinations it is necessary to compare the suffering before and after the introduction of the vaccine.” Without vaccinations, outbreaks of preventable disease are spread. An uprise of measles shows this, “In 2008, there were 140 measles cases in the US, which was the highest annual total since 1996. These cases were caused by increased measles transmission due to unvaccinated children. In 2014, 610 cases of measles were reported. This recent increase in the number of measles cases demonstrates the importance of vaccination.” Vaccination of the unprotected children could have prevented this number to spike. Roser also mentions other diseases like diphtheria, pertussis, smallpox, and rubella. Vaccinations reduce the outbreak of diseases and can even eliminate them.

Diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP3) immunization coverage, global and by major region, 1980-2011 – WHO6I

diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis-dtp3-immunization-coverage-global-and-by-major-region-1980-2011-who

The first thing I see is a bunch of colored lines and then bunch of orange bars behind them. The first thing I think the graph is doing is comparing 2 different things, that possibly have some correlation or relation. I do not like this chart I think it is very confusing and hard to understand. I would change that the graph is both a line graph and a bar graph, it makes it very busy and hard to understand the data. I would also change the color of the bar graphs or the lines, the bar graph is orange and so is one line and they overlap each other so it makes it hard to read some information. I would add a different x axis because there is no title and there are so many labels.

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One response to “In Class Annotation/ Critique

  1. Nice annotation, I understand what the article is about. I also agree that the graph is very busy. I get why they used a combo of a line and bar graph, but none the less its odd.

    Like

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