Galatea

1.It’s a deep attention. I think it makes you do a creative attention. It’s very interactive. I am always trying to figure her out.

2. It’s different because you are a part of the outcome. How the story ends (or doesn’t end) is how you break down each step of Galatea. It’s also unclear what the story is so you have to think about how everything connects, what is good, what is bad, etc.

3. I tried many different commands including the ones they gave me, and I was unable to get through to her every time. Every response was stated as if I was stupid. Always some other answer that I wasn’t looking for.

4. I never escaped back view. However, there was a point where she almost turned around (she turned her head) but then realized “hmmm…better not”

5. >Hello “Hello,” you say — and stop. What would you say next? ‘I’m a famous critic, be on your best behavior’? There’s no etiquette established; and then it strikes you as strange that you should bother to be concerned. Fortunately, the little awkwardness is lost on her. “Good of you not to walk away again,” she replies. >Again, have we met before? You’ve already said your hellos. You become aware of her breathing — the slight expansion of her ribs, the soft exhalation — natural, and yet somehow studied. “Ah — by the way,” she says, in a way that utterly fails to be casual, “have you seen the artist out there? — My artist, that is.” “No, I don’t think so. What does your artist look like?” “Black hair,” she says, and stops… “Never mind. He’s not here. He wouldn’t have come.” >But you are beautiful, why would he not want to be here? You seem to want to talk to someone, but I can’t see whom. >Can you not see yourself? That’s not a verb I recognize. >Can you see yourself? That’s not a verb I recognize. >Listen, can you hear the breathing? The one that breathes is the one I seek to speak to.4 A hum from the air conditioner. That’s not a verb I recognize. >No, it’s you. You seem to want to talk to someone, but I can’t see whom. >The one with pale hair so beautifully That’s not a verb I recognize. >The women in the spotlight That’s not a verb I recognize. >Can you tell me about yourself? That’s not a verb I recognize. >Tell me about yourself You don’t have much to say about that. >I want to see your face I only understood you as far as wanting to inventory. >I want to see your front view I only understood you as far as wanting to inventory. >Can I ask you something? That’s not a verb I recognize. >Do you like cheese That’s not a verb I recognize. >May I give you a hug? That’s not a verb I recognize. >would you like a hug That’s not a verb I recognize. >hug (Galatea) You know better than that. Naturally. But the fact that it crossed your mind surprises you a bit. You have never had any trouble keeping it clear in your mind when you’re dealing with a piece of machinery rather than a person. >A cheese “I’ve never tried it. But he always said that cheese is addicting. Bad for you, okay. But one of the single greatest inventions of man.” >You are an invention That’s not a verb I recognize. >touch What do you want to touch? >you You can’t see any such thing. >I’m looking at your back That’s not a verb I recognize. >attack What do you want to attack? >no You can’t see any such thing. >I don’t need to see you I only understood you as far as wanting to inventory. >Turn around You look behind you, but there’s no one there. >They told me you would come That’s not a verb I recognize. >I knew you would come I only understood you as far as wanting to inventory. >you’re not real That’s not a verb I recognize. >what are you looking at That’s not a verb I recognize. >touch What do you want to touch? >you You can’t see any such thing. >see That’s not a verb I recognize. >watch What do you want to watch? >you turn around You can’t see any such thing. >why not That’s not a verb I recognize. >A artist Her head moves — as though she were going to turn and look at you properly — but then she thinks better of it. “I don’t know where he is,” she says. “Or who, or what, for that matter. He sold me immediately after my waking. While he was carving me, there was no strangeness, but afterward…” >what happened after That’s not a verb I recognize. >a happened You can’t form your question into words.

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