Galatea

This activity engaged me in an aggravating way as I’m sure it did the rest of the class.  Having to guess over and over again only to be answered with “Thats not a verb I recognize” is extremely annoying.  This is different than reading a short story because you decide where the story goes. Depending on what you ask is what you will get back.  Galatea only replies to questions that are in her program which can take many paths.  I tried all of the action commands and got answers like “What do you want to touch?”. I did not get very far she never turned at all for me.

>look The Gallery’s End Unlit, except for the single spotlight; unfurnished, except for the defining swath of black velvet. And a placard on a little stand. On the pedestal is Galatea. >listen Movement beyond the corner; a pause; retreat. “You might try speaking to me,” she prompts. “It’s not polite merely to stare. And I’ve gotten very bored, standing here.” (An attempt to engage the audience — the proactive element… you frame the words for your review, but you find that you can’t get as far as a complete first sentence. There’s something more here; anxious, chilly, visceral. Better pay attention.) >smell You smell nothing unexpected. >touch What do you want to touch? >taste What do you want to taste? >hello “Hello,” you say — and stop. What would you say next? ‘I’m a famous critic, be on your best behavior’? There’s no etiquette established; and then it strikes you as strange that you should bother to be concerned. Fortunately, the little awkwardness is lost on her. “Good of you not to walk away again,” she replies. >tell What do you want to tell Galatea about? >my family (Galatea about the relatives) Where would you begin? And what context would she have for anything you could say? She has had no childhood, no history, no network of passions and friends.The persistent inclination to tell her such things takes you by surprise. Animates are notoriously poor at processing uncontextualized personal information. And you know better than to waste your time. But this piece of logic doesn’t banish the desire to confide in her. >love family That’s not a verb I recognize. >love That’s not a verb I recognize. >sorry’ That’s not a verb I recognize. >sorry She just shakes her head. “I don’t know what you’re apologizing for.” You become aware of her breathing — the slight expansion of her ribs, the soft exhalation — natural, and yet somehow studied. “Ah — by the way,” she says, in a way that utterly fails to be casual, “have you seen the artist out there? — My artist, that is.” “No, I don’t think so. What does your artist look like?” “Black hair,” she says, and stops… “Never mind. He’s not here. He wouldn’t have come.” >think about What do you want to think about? >you You’ve no opinions on the subject. >attack What do you want to attack? >you You can’t see any such thing. >A cheese “I’ve never tried it. But he always said that cheese is addicting. Bad for you, okay. But one of the single greatest inventions of man.” >horse That’s not a verb I recognize. >planting That’s not a verb I recognize. >laugh That’s not a verb I recognize. >Love lost That’s not a verb I recognize. >shame That’s not a verb I recognize. >friendship That’s not a verb I recognize. >recap Topics you’ve covered include: studio references >alive? That’s not a verb I recognize. >alive That’s not a verb I recognize. >

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